May 02

What determines the success of an online video campaign has been debated not only by us here at Preview Networks, but by industry experts alike. Although there is no one secret ingredient which makes a video go viral (check out this Ted talk video on why), good content spreads like a virus, whether you intended it to or not. Good content triggers are different for everyone but chances are if you make something informative as well as entertaining, it will catch on.

Relevancy of the video content to your brand helps link the cognitive side with receiver involvement (Source: Wright, P.L.). In other words, this could help determine whether a user might actively share the video or not. Not only that, but relevancy in terms of alignment of the brand need with the audience reached and context provided by the publisher, increases the chance the right person at the right time is seeing your video (Source: Gigaom).

The Evian Baby advertising campaigns are an excellent example of this. According to Evian, there is a history of its brand being connected with babies which dates back to 1935. Evian was first recommended as the perfect water for babies in France back then, and still to this day it is the number one water used by mothers for the same reason due to the pH-neutral mineral composition (Source: International Business Times).

Evian’s “Roller Babies” campaign in 2009 currently holds the official Guinness World Record for most viral video of all time (Source: Business Insider). This year, they are back with their “Baby & Me” campaign and if the views on YouTube  and mentions on Twitter are any indication of this year’s campaign success, Evian is well on their way to another viral video success.

Preview Networks is delighted to have been involved in contributing to the campaign’s audience relevancy and reach outside of YouTube on premium publisher sites in 11 different countries in addition to a dynamic image creation on top of the custom player created specifically for YouTube. A combination of on and off YouTube syndication strategy ensured the campaign received maximum exposure. However, at the end of the day sometimes great content speaks for itself.

About Preview Networks

Preview Networks is a content marketing platform for brands and content aggregation and syndication platform for publishers. We provide the tools for brands to centrally distribute and manage marketing and PR content across media destinations, devices, and commerce platforms; allowing media partners to automate content acquisition delivering audience and advertising revenue growth. Acquired by Rightster in February 2013, our combined offering strengthens video distribution, marketing, and monetisation services globally.

Tagged with:
Apr 03

Last week’s blog post and the news of Spotify’s plans to potentially begin producing their own video content has inspired me to look into other businesses who have made the move to do the same. The example that comes to mind first for online video is Netflix with the launch of their original series House of Cards. When news of the series broke in February, there were many articles written speculating whether it would be a hit or pay off given the $100 million investment for two 13 episode seasons. With monthly subscriptions for Netflix costing $7.99 and having collected data from users indicating interest in the new series with no raise in price, they would need to add 520,834 subscriptions over two years in order to break even on the House of Cards investment (Source: Slate.comThe Atlantic Wire.com). When considering that Netflix plans to produce a total of 5 new shows per year, including the already highly anticipated Arrested Development, the raise in subscriptions needed becomes less daunting. Particularly since Netflix saw a 13 percent increase in streaming viewers over a one year span in the U.S. from 24 million to 27 million prior to the new content initiatives (Source: The Atlantic Wire.com).Screen Shot 2013-04-03 at 4.45.10 PM

Netflix has been said to use Big Data to predict the shows success before it even began using algorithms combining the popularity of director David Fincher and actor Kevin Spacey and using peak period and content type data streams (Source: The New York Times.com). However, it has also been argued that Big Data can only report past preferences and not predict what people will like in the future. According to John Landgraf of FX Networks, number-crunching would never have predicted the success of shows like The Sopranos, South Park, and Mad Men for example (Source: NYTimes.com).

Does the same theory apply to music? As a personal user of Spotify myself I get huge amounts of satisfaction by using their radio service based on an artist I like to find and listen to new music. Why wouldn’t Spotify then use data from their 5 million paying subscribers and 20 million active users to begin producing their own music based on consumer preferences (Source: Spotify.com)? Why the move to online video? While we know it’s a hot space to be in, the competition is tough and one could question whether this would fragment the landscape even more. Many a musical artist has been found and even discovered via YouTube (e.g. Justin Bieber) which combines both video and music, so how Spotify will distinguish themselves by creating original content remains to be seen (Source: Mashable).

While the Netflix move and Spotify news are all very exciting to speculate about, brands have been producing their own video content for some time. We all know about the emergent trend of brands becoming more like media companies, particularly with the production and distribution of online video (Source: Preview Networks Blog). Major fashion labels like Chanel and popular consumer products such as Red Bull have been producing their own content marketing for years, distinguishing themselves from advertising centric strategies. Even B2B companies are joining the ranks of online producers with Rightster Studios’ launch of their online comedy football show “Off The Ball” which can be seen on YouTube and ESPN making their model more of a B2B2C (Source: Rightster.com). Instead of physical products or subscriptions however, the break-even point lies in distribution and advertising.

About Preview Networks

Preview Networks is a content marketing platform for brands and content aggregation and syndication platform for publishers. We provide the tools for brands to centrally distribute and manage marketing and PR content across media destinations, devices, and commerce platforms; allowing media partners to automate content acquisition delivering audience and advertising revenue growth. Acquired by Rightster in February 2013, our combined offering strengthens video distribution, marketing, and monetisation services globally.

Mar 27
Yahoo-Spotify

Image courtesy of pcworld.com.mx

For a slow holiday week, there are a couple of big news stories that could potentially change the landscape of the online video space. It could all be speculation, but anyone that pays attention to what’s happening in online video or is in charge of digital marketing for their organisations should probably take note nonetheless.

The Stories:

On March 25th the Business Insider and Fast Company both released stories about major players looking to do some interesting things with video. First up is Spotify, the digital music service that allows users to play music wherever and whenever they are online, via computer, tablet, or mobile, for a monthly fee. The service also has a social element to it which allows users to create playlists, see what their friends are listening to, and share great new song discoveries. While Spotify is popular with many consumers, their margins are relatively low due to the fact that they have to pay the music labels each time a user listens to a song. Therefore, they are looking for ways to create exclusive content to increase their margins and turning to video. Whether that means they become another on-demand video service such as Netflix or HBO creating successful series such as House of Cards or Sex and the City remains to be seen (Source: Business Insider).

Another interesting development in the online video space this week revolves around Yahoo. They are in talks to buy Dailymotion, a relatively small YouTube competitor which, according to Fast Company proves “that the future of the Internet lies squarely in video” (Source: Fast Company). The article makes some pretty impressive points in terms of how the web is shifting from text to online video which makes the potential Dailymotion purchase by Yahoo all the more interesting. While YouTube is for the moment the “single point of upload and playback for web video” other major players such as Facebook, AOL, and Amazon have made an impact in the video space. Most notably for those of us in the video syndication space, is AOL’s revenue jump in part due to their 5Min acquisition.  This has allowed them to build a video network with a mix of created, curated, and live video with the ”understanding that they need to be both a destination and a distributor of video to third party sites” (Source: Fast Company).

The Trends:

The three trends the Dailymotion acquisition and/or the Spotify video business model move could validate for the growing popularity of the use of online video revolve around: audience, devices, and money. The holy trinity for lack of a better term. Video drives website traffic and the increasing use of mobile devices increases the use of video, which ultimately brings in advertising revenues. Here are a few fun facts to chew on keeping those trends in mind:

Audience: The sum of all forms of video (TV, video on demand [VoD], Internet, and P2P) will be approximately 86 percent of global consumer traffic by 2016. (Cisco)

Devices: 93% of smartphone users use their devices in the home, and almost 50% of users watch videos on their smartphones. 90% of smartphone searches result in an action such as a purchase or a visit to a business. (Google Blog, April 2011)

Money: Online video is the fastest growing ad format in 2012 with nearly 55% growth. (eMarketer, January 2012). The online video industry will reach $28.72 billion in 2017, soaring from the $3.79 billion recorded in 2010 and the $11.14 billion expected in 2012. (Digital TV Research). Source: Fast Company

About Preview Networks

Preview Networks is a content marketing platform for brands and content aggregation and syndication platform for publishers. We provide the tools for brands to centrally distribute and manage marketing and PR content across media destinations, devices, and commerce platforms; allowing media partners to automate content acquisition delivering audience and advertising revenue growth. Acquired by Rightster in February 2013, our combined offering strengthens video distribution, marketing, and monetisation services globally.

Jan 23

Views, like friends, and followers is a numbers game. It’s what you do with those views and friends and followers that matters. Are you funny and witty with your posts? Do you share insightful and valuable information? Once you’ve gained the audience with number of views, how do you keep them interested in your brand? Views can create exposure and advertising opportunities, but engagement can indicate loyalty and purchase intent. It all depends on the success criteria a brand is looking to measure. Enagement

Many articles have been written about this topic and often use YouTube as an example of the mothership of all portals in terms of video. The key word here is portal. It’s a once stop shop used for direct search purposes, after hearing about some song, commercial, video, or event. The popularity of the video is often measured by the number of views it has received. However, the chances of anyone stumbling across a branded video is slight, which is a challenge if views are what brands are after. Not only that, but a recent study found that user engagement could actually be more difficult on YouTube (Source: MediaPost). Therefore, YouTube is one strategy, not the only strategy.

The above mentioned study compared 20 YouTube videos using TrueView as a strategy, with the same 20 videos using a video syndication strategy. It used a measurement formula called Engagement Per Thousand Views (EPM) to measure likes, comments, tweets, pins, shares and posts to calculate the engagement per 1,000 views. The engagement factor was significantly lower for the TrueView videos compared to the videos syndicated to other websites outside of YouTube. Facebook engagement in particular, was higher for the syndicated branded videos than it was for UGC videos, which is good news for brands (Source: MediaPost).

We have discussed the views versus engagement debate over a series of multiple past posts in this blog, which basically sum up the challenges of marketing video in a banner world, focused on impressions. There are also many industry articles discussing the challenges to the viewing tracking mechanism by companies like comScore with the introduction of vCE, and most recently a vCPM proposal, by a member of the “Data Driven Thinking” community (Source: adexchanger.com). While the industry is still settling on a uniformed standard, brands will need to decide for themselves which is the most measurable and meaningful way for them to track.

About Preview Networks

Preview Networks is a content marketing platform for brands and content aggregation and syndication platform for publishers. We provide the tools for brands to centrally distribute and manage marketing and PR content across media destinations, devices, and commerce platforms; allowing media partners to automate content acquisition delivering audience and advertising revenue growth.

Jan 26

Create Your Brand-Owned TV Channel

By Heather Timmerman Digital Media Trends Comments Off

One of the multiple video predictions of 2012 was an increase in branded-content production, and early research into 2012 has proven that to be true. Many retailers and major brands are moving beyond publishing videos on websites and media outlets to creating their brand-owned TV channels online. This move is allowing these brands to increase consumer engagement, track behaviour and ultimately increase online sales (Source: MarketingWeek).

Image courtesy of PinkTV

Case examples from brands such as Thomas Pink, Marks & Spencer, LookFantastic, and BrandAlley talk about their experiences with this form of online brand building in a recent article by Marketing Week. Many brands begin by posting videos on YouTube or brand websites and eventually evolve into an online TV channel platform as a testing playground. The results have included consumers spending longer amounts of time on the online TV channel, looking at three times as many products compared to non-viewers.

Instructional  or ‘how to’ videos seem to be the most popular form of online TV content, particularly for the fashion or beauty brands mentioned above. For example, a popular strategy for Thomas Pink has been to post videos on how to tie a bow tie or Windsor knot, building their brand equity and expertise online. Brands such as BrandAlley have identified that this form of content platform attracts a younger audience which has allowed them to cater different content to their male and female viewers.

With these mass customisation strategies, an instructional tool-set for how to create engaging product videos is necessary. Luckily due to the popularity of online video, these best practice guides are beginning to pop up all over the internet. Below are a couple for your reference. In addition, check out a previous post describing how product videos improve consumer decision accuracy.

Product Video Guides:

How-to Product Video Examples from 5 E-Commerce Businesses
Product Video Best Practice Guide 2012

About Preview Networks

Preview Networks is a platform for brands and content aggregation and syndication platform for publishers. We provide the tools for brands to centrally distribute and manage marketing and PR content across media destinations, devices, and commerce platforms; allowing media partners to automate content acquisition delivering audience and advertising revenue growth.

Jan 12

There have been no shortage of Google+ articles in the past few days talking about Google’s latest moves to take over social or rather, become more social.  Which prompted a relevant question. Where are videos most seen online? Social networks like Facebook and Twitter or via search engines like Google and Yahoo? Additionally, how many video views are active versus passive? Meaning, direct searches for a video (active),  compared to views through eWOM (electronic word of mouth), or independent video discovery (passive).

Image courtesy of thebizcoachblog.com

We have blogged up to our eyeballs in the past about how online video enhances the online viewing experience. Drawing the consumer into a more engaging experience and eventually deeper into the sales cycle. In case you have missed those blogs, here are a couple to bring you up to speed: Gain Competitive Advantage with Online Video and The Power of Video. This is good context to have when discussing the active versus passive views, as mentioned above. One can assume it’s the passive viewer that gets pulled unintentionally into the sales cycle, and also the viewer we are typically referencing when we encourage the influence product and brand video has on the average online consumer.

However, when it comes to overall numbers it appears that search has long been the leader in online video views (Source: ReelSEO), as indicated by a Q1 & Q2 2011 study by Brightcove and TubeMogul. According to this report, when it comes to referral traffic, video discovery by Google search was up 3.7% quarter over quarter with Facebook down in the 2nd quarter. It is worth noting that this report only covers two quarters and one piece of the puzzle. Referral traffic, or eWOM. Direct video views and passive video views are still a mystery to be found by other studies.

What we do know though, is Google’s YouTube still draws the most viewers month after month (eMarketer Whitepaper). That means, there may be no search versus social debate after-all, as Google seems to have both covered.

About Preview Networks

Preview Networks is a platform for brands and content aggregation and syndication platform for publishers. We provide the tools for brands to centrally distribute and manage marketing and PR content across media destinations, devices, and commerce platforms; allowing media partners to automate content acquisition delivering audience and advertising revenue growth.

 

Tagged with:
Jan 06

It’s YouTube – Not YourTube

By Ervin Draganovic Digital Media Trends Comments Off

The moving picture appeal of versus still graphics or written content is progressively influencing consumer behaviours and preferences. While marketers and retailers are becoming aware they need to be scalable when it comes to , most of them are left confused when deciding which video strategy to use. “Let’s just upload everything to , or wait! Should we host it ourselves?” should be an extension of the video strategy, not the strategy itself.

Image courtesy of zeroone.com

With more than 48 hours of content aggregated every minute and over 3 billion video views delivered a day, there is no doubt that YouTube is the most popular . Moreover, while these numbers are most often used in pitches arguing for using YouTube as the primary video destination and distribution platform, the numbers should be put into context for corporate video.

On a philosophical level, placing corporate videos primarily on YouTube is like placing a product on the lowest shelf somewhere in the corner of WalMart, while hoping that your product will get some consumer attention. The total amount of content shared on YouTube creates a high level of disturbance, which removes any hope of creating a controlled content consumption environment.

Additional arguments for not using YouTube as the primary platform are as follows:

  • YouTube is a entertainment platform – not a commerce channel
  • YouTube’s biggest interest is to get people to YouTube.com – not to a company domain
  • Uploading content to YouTube improves YouTube stickiness – not company domain stickiness
  • YouTube is about playlists – not call to action (CTA) opportunities
  • YouTube powered videos are likely to improve organic search results, however the video is linked to YouTube – not company domains where the product can be purchased

Instead of focusing only on YouTube, companies should invest in platforms that will bring exclusive video content propositions to its domain. With the right solution and execution, the video empowered domain can easily boost search engine results, increase stickiness, and improve conversion rates. As consumers continue to increase engagement levels on YouTube, companies should aim at utilizing the platform as a secondary vehicle for its corporate videos, not the focal strategy.

About Preview Networks

Preview Networks is a platform for brands and content aggregation and syndication platform for publishers. We provide the tools for brands to centrally distribute and manage marketing and PR content across media destinations, devices, and commerce platforms; allowing media partners to automate content acquisition delivering audience and advertising revenue growth.

Related posts

preload preload preload