Jan 30

Since the launch of Facebook’s Graph Search product (which has yet to reach European audiences) there has been a lot of articles written and conceptual analysis done in terms of what this means for marketers, brands and behaviour. Some say it will change the way people use the site, others say it will change search behaviour altogether. The critics and skeptics have other opinions which I find increasingly intriguing. In this post, we’ll present both sides of the argument, discuss what brands and marketers should do to prepare themselves, and reflect on what Graph Search means for photos and video. Screen Shot 2013-01-30 at 3.03.34 PM

What is Graph Search?

It is a known marketing fact that word of mouth (WOM) can influence a brand, product or service. Whether or not that influence is positive or negative depends on consumer experiences and who you ask. Facebook knows that the power of a recommendation is very strong, particularly among friends and social circles. In fact, “92% of consumers believe a recommendation from a friend over marketing from a brand, according to Anna Banks, VP of strategy at Organic” (Source: MediaPost). Therefore, Facebook is counting on Graph Search to alter user behaviour on Facebook, which they hope will in turn become an advertising opportunity for brands. Whether users actually turn to Facebook for search instead of photos, videos and status updates remains to be seen.

What Does it Mean for Google?

The skeptics have analyzed whether another search tool will be able to break the Google habit so many people have come to adapt. According to an article by Eli Goodman, Habit = Confluence of Utility + Frequency (Source: Search Engine Watch). What that basically means is the more useful something is, the more frequent it becomes, which could ultimately turn into a habit. Will the average user turn to Facebook for their everyday search or only when they want to know something about their friends? The latter is more likely and the actual purpose of Graph Search according to Zuckerberg (Source: smallbusiness.yahoo.com).

How Should Brands Prepare?

Facebook has indicated that currently only 16% of brand content is seen by their fans, which means Graph Search could increase brand exposure given the appropriate content strategy is in place (ibid.). Brands ”should be aware of how crucial the information on their Pages is and that they are accurately tagged and organized so they show up in these new searches” (Source: adexchanger.com). So now is the time to start updating those company profiles and timelines with interesting content including photos and videos. Particularly given the fact that photos generate twice as many likes on Facebook and videos are shared twelve times more than links and text posts (Source: mediabistro.com)

Another perspective based on an article from Econsultancy suggests that marketers and brands should be afraid of Graph Search due to the fact that users may not like how much information they are able to see about their friends or themselves. For the first time, users will be able to see how much information they have shared with Facebook which could raise the well known privacy concern, and prompt them to change their behaviour not in Facebook’s favour. Regardless of the outcome, it’s never a bad idea to increase focus on brand profiles and make sure visual content is up front and centre.

About Preview Networks

Preview Networks is a content marketing platform for brands and content aggregation and syndication platform for publishers. We provide the tools for brands to centrally distribute and manage marketing and PR content across media destinations, devices, and commerce platforms; allowing media partners to automate content acquisition delivering audience and advertising revenue growth.

Tagged with:
Oct 24

The inspiration for this post comes from a great article based on a McKinsey report which can be summed up by this one simple message: marketing is complicated. In a world where the channels and vehicles available to deliver a brand or marketing message has increased from few to many, and where consumer attention spans and patience are becoming increasingly short, one could argue the audience and attention fragmentation of the industry and consumer is working against the average marketer. 

On the other hand, there are more tools and technology on the market today than there has ever been to target consumers and measure the success of those efforts. This opens up the possibility for marketers to be more strategic than ever before. In a recent Forrester blog post the concept of marketing mix modeling (MMM) was discussed which effectively measures the sales impact and ROI from marketing activities. However, marketing mix modeling not only requires a dramatic internal shift in decision-making processes, measurement frameworks, and cross-functional collaboration, it also requires a new marketing skill set (Michael Glantz, blogs.forrester.com). Marketing is now the mix of right-brain creatives and left-brand analysts, in one person or team. If marketing involves the science of targeting and behavior, the art of content development, and the technology of distributing a brand message, then “The CMO job is part art, part science, and part media publisher” (siliconvalleywatcher.com). The question is whether the internal shift and resources required can keep up with the pace of external change.

If we consider the publisher aspect of marketing only, marketing media channels consist of not only traditional ones such as print and TV, but also digital channels across multiple platforms including websites, tablets, mobile, and connected TV. The marketer is expected to not only develop the creative, but also make strategic distribution channel decisions, and report back on the effects of the campaign compared to sales. While that is a fantastic full-circle effect, more media channels bring more promotion, technical and data opportunities, not to mention challenges. (See Online Video Advertising Challenges & Opportunities). With all the technology and data available, it’s hard not to let the possibilities overshadow the marketing message, but the expression “content is king” has been discussed by almost every player in the industry (including us!) for a reason.

All the technology in the world doesn’t mean a thing if the content does nothing for you. Because marketing is both a science and art, it has the ability to evoke emotion and change behavior. The technology available today creates engagement and co-creation opportunities between the brand and consumer that add up to real-time action and future development possibilities. While the digital marketer needs to understand the technical opportunities and limitations, the concept or idea should take center stage in order to create great content, and evoke the response the brand wants. Never has this point been made more clear than through the experiment by Google called Project Re:Brief. They brought in “old-school” advertising legends to work with “new-school” marketers and major brands. The result was an incredible mix of old and new school tricks, creating engagement with consumers and solidifying brand position in the market.

About Preview Networks

Preview Networks is a content marketing platform for brands and content aggregation and syndication platform for publishers. We provide the tools for brands to centrally distribute and manage marketing and PR content across media destinations, devices, and commerce platforms; allowing media partners to automate content acquisition delivering audience and advertising revenue growth.

 

Jan 12

There have been no shortage of Google+ articles in the past few days talking about Google’s latest moves to take over social or rather, become more social.  Which prompted a relevant question. Where are videos most seen online? Social networks like Facebook and Twitter or via search engines like Google and Yahoo? Additionally, how many video views are active versus passive? Meaning, direct searches for a video (active),  compared to views through eWOM (electronic word of mouth), or independent video discovery (passive).

Image courtesy of thebizcoachblog.com

We have blogged up to our eyeballs in the past about how online video enhances the online viewing experience. Drawing the consumer into a more engaging experience and eventually deeper into the sales cycle. In case you have missed those blogs, here are a couple to bring you up to speed: Gain Competitive Advantage with Online Video and The Power of Video. This is good context to have when discussing the active versus passive views, as mentioned above. One can assume it’s the passive viewer that gets pulled unintentionally into the sales cycle, and also the viewer we are typically referencing when we encourage the influence product and brand video has on the average online consumer.

However, when it comes to overall numbers it appears that search has long been the leader in online video views (Source: ReelSEO), as indicated by a Q1 & Q2 2011 study by Brightcove and TubeMogul. According to this report, when it comes to referral traffic, video discovery by Google search was up 3.7% quarter over quarter with Facebook down in the 2nd quarter. It is worth noting that this report only covers two quarters and one piece of the puzzle. Referral traffic, or eWOM. Direct video views and passive video views are still a mystery to be found by other studies.

What we do know though, is Google’s YouTube still draws the most viewers month after month (eMarketer Whitepaper). That means, there may be no search versus social debate after-all, as Google seems to have both covered.

About Preview Networks

Preview Networks is a platform for brands and content aggregation and syndication platform for publishers. We provide the tools for brands to centrally distribute and manage marketing and PR content across media destinations, devices, and commerce platforms; allowing media partners to automate content acquisition delivering audience and advertising revenue growth.

 

Tagged with:
Mar 22

SEO 101 for Cinema Sites

By Victor Potrel News we can use, Technology Comments Off

If you were to open a restaurant, the first thing you would think would be: “how are people going to find out about me?” And if you have the chance to be on the Champs Elysées (to take a French example), then you are sure to be seen.

Now replace this restaurant with your website and the Champs Elysées with the first page of Google.* You get my point, right?  Search Engine Optimization (SEO) for your website or blog is the key if you want people to find out about it.

There are a lot of things that can be done to help your SEO. An important one is the keywords you use on your website. The words you use in your pages, titles and especially website URL. Now, that’s a nice thing to know, but which keywords are the most effective for me?  Well, Google of course, provides a free tool to help you.

Google insight for search allows you to test keywords against others. You can filter by countries, regions, years and categories.  Once you entered your keywords, you can check their trend for people searching them. You can also compare them and have information on regional searches and associated key words.

Let’s take an example and stay in the French theme. A quick search for “bande annonce”(filmtrailer) against “bandes annonces” (filmtrailers) demonstrates the importance of checking your keywords – “bande annonce” has risen steeply since 2009 against a decreasing “bandes annonces”.  The volume of search for the two keywords is 51 for “bande annonce” against 6 for “bandes annonces”.  That is, the first one is searched 8,5 times more! What this means for you is that using the keyword “bande annonce” will increase your search engine position and help people find out about you.

Another interesting insight is the progression of searches for “bande annonce”.  Looking at this trend, we can see that the volume of search more than doubles in 2 years.  This is something to take into account for the needs of your audience when it comes to viewing trailers online.

Would you like more from Victor?  Check out his Twitter page: http://twitter.com/victor_ld

About Preview Networks

Preview Networks is Europe’s largest preview distribution network. We serve websites, apps and . Our is available on MSN, , IMDB, , The Times, MySpace, The Guardian, El Pais, El Mundo, Le Monde and more than 1,500 other online media. We work with more than 300 companies including Sony, Fox, Disney, Warner, Universal, and Paramount. Learn more on previewnetworks.com

Tagged with:
Dec 27

Will Smartphones rule in 2011?

By Heather Timmerman Digital Media Trends, General Comments Off

As the current year comes to a close we are curious about the upcoming trends the new year will bring.  If you’ve followed our blog in 2010 you have heard us talk about mobile A LOT.   Not only does the statistical trending data support this, but we have the customer requests for mobile apps in nearly all markets to back it up.

See past blogs on: Filmtrailer AppCinematografo.it, Windows 7 on CineTrailer, iBest Movie App, My Movies iPhone App as just a few examples of this trend.   However, we are aware that not everyone is on the mobile train when it comes to normal every day use.

Recent data from comScore seems to suggest that smartphone subscribers in the U.S. lean towards the 25 – 44 age group.  That’s a good amount of the population at 51% of smartphone subscribers and 36% of total mobile subscribers which means there is reason to believe this could be an increasing trend.

Apple is leading the way with the iPhone, but it will be interesting to see how usage will be affected with Google and Microsoft also in the market.  According to research posted from IDC in the New York Times, they predict that “half of the 2.1 billion people who regularly use the Internet will do so using non-PC devices” in 2011.  That’s a pretty big prediction if we do say so ourselves, but one we will definitely keep our eye on in the new year.

About Preview Networks

Preview Networks is Europe’s largest preview distribution network. We serve websites, apps and internet TV. Our content is available on MSN, , IMDB, , The Times, MySpace, The Guardian, El Pais, El Mundo, Le Monde and more than 1,500 other online media. We work with more than 300 companies including Sony, Fox, Disney, Warner, Universal, and Paramount. Learn more on previewnetworks.com

Tagged with:
Dec 10

Is Google going to Hollywood?

By Heather Timmerman Digital Media Trends Comments Off

In October we blogged about Internet TV and compared Apple to Google and how it was a space to keep an eye on.   Google’s recent acquisition of Widevine, a digital content protection and video optimization technology provider,  could also potentially make Google a serious player in the digital video delivery arena. 

YouTube aside, they now have the ability to deliver premium content to various platforms using Android, Google TV and Chrome technologies.

Given the relationships they absorbed in the aquisition including such names as: Panasonic, LG, Best Buy, boxee, Sonic Solutions, LOVEFiLM, Samsung, DISH Network, Netflix, and Blockbuster, they could be in a prime position to license and deliver content for major Hollywood studios without criticism, if that is the route they choose.   Which means, Google might be the one to keep your eye on when it comes to the video ecosystem.   The question is, what move will they make next?

About Preview Networks

Preview Networks is Europe’s largest preview distribution network. We serve websites, apps and internet TV. Our content is available on MSN, , IMDB, , The Times, MySpace, The Guardian, El Pais, El Mundo, Le Monde and more than 1,500 other online media. We work with more than 300 companies including Sony, Fox, Disney, Warner, Universal, and Paramount. Learn more on previewnetworks.com

Tagged with:
Nov 08

According to a Q2  report by Brightcove and TubeMogul labeled “Online Video & the Media Industry”, the most referred video online came from the social networking sites Facebook and Twitter.

Not only that, but social network viewers watched video longer compared to viewers who were referred to video from search sites such as Google and Yahoo! One minute and 47 seconds to be exact, whereas Google viewers watched video for one minute 34 seconds and Yahoo! for one minute 27 seconds.

Word of mouth is long believed to be one of the best ways to get information and in an article by MediaPost News, Jeff Whatcott of Brightcove was quoted saying: “It used to be all about search.  But Facebook and Twitter are becoming significant traffic drivers, since social networks are increasingly how people are discovering video.”

Speaking of video referral traffic, Facebook is growing at an average monthly rate of 48% and Twitter at an average of 38.7% followed by 35% for Yahoo! and 15.5% for Google, according to the Q2 report.   At this rate, it is projected that Facebook (currently at 7.9%) will surpass Yahoo! (16.8%) and be second to Google (40.1%) for overall video streams by the end of the year.

A prediction many are sure to keep their eyes on.

About Preview Networks

Preview Networks is Europe’s largest preview distribution network. We serve websites, , mobile apps and internet TV. Our content is available on MSN, MTV, Brightcove, IMDB, , The Times, MySpace, The Guardian, El Pais, El Mundo, Le Monde and more than 1,500 other online media. We work with more than 300 entertainment companies including Sony, Fox, Disney, Warner, Universal, and Paramount. Learn more on previewnetworks.com

Tagged with:
preload preload preload